The reality of chemotherapy side effects

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The reality of chemotherapy side effects
My latest publication shows that over three-quarters of people having chemotherapy in New South Wales experience multiple side effects during their treatment, and for over 60% of people this included a serious side effect. These results confirm previous research that suggests side effects might be more common, and more serious, in clinical practice (ie ‘real ...

Cancer deaths to cost Ireland €73 billion over the next 20 years

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A paper I worked on at the National Cancer Registry Ireland has been published in the journal BMC Cancer. Together with my collaborators, we estimated that deaths from cancer over the next 20 years will cost the Irish economy €73 billion in lost productivity. When people die from cancer, society loses their contribution to the ...

Our respondents didn’t understand these questions – do you?

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Dr Alison Pearce has won a Best Poster Presentation Award at the Health Economics Study Group Winter Meeting 2016 (HESG) held in Manchester in January 2016. The award was given for Alison’s poster “Our respondents didn’t understand these questions – do you? Cognitive interviewing highlights unanticipated decision making in a discrete choice experiment.” The poster described 17 ...

ISPOR Best New Investigator Award

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Dr Alison Pearce has won a Best New Investigator Presentation Award at the Annual European Congress of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). The award recognises the scientific merit of a podium presentation at the conference, which was held in Milan, Italy. The award was given for Alison’s work which found that ...

Research on the costs of cancer to be presented at an international conference in India

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Cancer deaths in Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (the largest emerging economies in the world) result in over $51 billion (USD) in lost productivity each year. These results are being presented at an international conference in India today. Researchers at the National Cancer Registry Ireland (NCRI) have estimated that lost productivity due to ...

Is prostate cancer follow-up by GPs more efficient than hospital based care?

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After treatment for prostate cancer, men have ongoing follow-up to monitor for the cancer returning, and to manage any treatment side effects. Traditionally, this follow-up is done by specialist clinicians in the hospital setting, but the growing number of prostate cancer survivors means this is not sustainable. Evidence suggests that follow-up by a GP, instead ...

Research into costs of cancer follow-up wins MASCC conference award

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Dr Alison Pearce has won a Young Investigator of the Year Award at the Annual Meeting on Supportive Care in Cancer, hosted by the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC) and the International Society of Oral Oncology (ISOO). The Young Investigator of the Year Awards recognise outstanding young investigators’ research accomplishments. The award was ...

The cost to society for time off work after head and neck cancer

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When people take time off work because of cancer, society loses their contribution to the economy. Our new study looks at different ways of valuing this contribution. Most people with cancer take some time off work for treatment, recuperation and rehabilitation. As well as impacting on a person’s sense of identity and quality of life, ...

Returning to work after head and neck cancer

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A new paper published in the Journal of Cancer Survivorship by researchers at the National Cancer Registry investigates the patterns of return to work in people with head and neck cancer. The study looked at people diagnosed with head and neck cancer who had been working at the time of diagnosis.  It found that while ...

Article published in The Conversation

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Cancer rates are set to double in Ireland by 2040 – here’s why By Alison Pearce, National Cancer Registry Ireland and Harry Comber, National Cancer Registry Ireland The latest projections from the National Cancer Registry show that the number of new cancer cases being diagnosed each year in Ireland is expected to double by 2040. ...